GHM Monthly Speaker Series-Galloping in the Gallatin-Brenda Wahler
Oct
2
6:00 PM18:00

GHM Monthly Speaker Series-Galloping in the Gallatin-Brenda Wahler

Galloping in the Gallatin-Brenda Wahler

Organized horse racing in Bozeman dates to the 1870s, Three Forks may have hosted the first Steeplechases in Montana, and Bozeman was the birthplace of William “Smokey” Saunders, a Triple Crown–winning jockey. But Gallatin County’s brightest years centered in nearby Belgrade during the 1950s and 1960s. In 1954, Lloyd Shelhamer Jr., and his wife, the former Jane Ringling, built and operated the Beaumont Club, the most glamorous and modern racetrack in Montana.

A fourth-generation Montanan with a lifelong interest in horses and history, Brenda Wahler showed horses in the 1970s and 1980s, when the racing community was a major presence at fairgrounds across the country. Through college and beyond, she taught riding and judged horse shows. Today, she is an attorney and owns Wahler Equine, an education and consulting business. She and her husband live near Helena, Montana, with assorted horses and house pets.

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GHM Monthly Speaker Series-Encounters in Yellowstone-M. Mark Miller
Nov
6
6:00 PM18:00

GHM Monthly Speaker Series-Encounters in Yellowstone-M. Mark Miller

On August 23, 1877, a scout named Jack Bean watched 600 Nez Perce Indians head into the new Yellowstone National Park. Bean rushed 60 miles to the nearest telegraph office to tell the army where the Indians were going. He didn’t take time to warn tourists who were visiting the park that was then a roadless wilderness. The Indians flight for freedom is a touchstone of the history of the American West, so most people know about their 1,200-mile running battle with the army that ended just forty miles from the Canadian border and freedom. However few know the stories of the confrontations between the Nez Perce and park tourists. Encounters in Yellowstone tells about those thrilling adventures: Emma Cowan’s watching Indians shoot her husband in the head and then taking her captive; Andrew Weikert’s blazing gun battles when he tries to rescue friends missing after an Indian attack, and George Cowan’s six-mile crawl to get help after he was shot three times and left for dead. The book tells these and other true stories with all the detail and drama of fiction.

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GHM Monthly Speaker Series-He Might Strike it Still: A Brief History of Cooke City-Kelly S. Hartman
Dec
4
6:00 PM18:00

GHM Monthly Speaker Series-He Might Strike it Still: A Brief History of Cooke City-Kelly S. Hartman

Join author and historian Kelly Hartman on a journey from the remote mountainsides surrounding Cooke City to the chairs of Washington D.C. as the saga of a railroad to the mines played out nearly 100 years ago. Learn about the lives lived in waiting for the great boom, and the rise of tourism that makes the area what it is today.

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The Lasting Legacy of Walter Cooper's Guns-Talk and Discussion by Kirk Stovall
Sep
13
6:30 PM18:30

The Lasting Legacy of Walter Cooper's Guns-Talk and Discussion by Kirk Stovall

Calling all Local History Buffs, Gun Collectors, and Anyone Interested in Early Bozeman…Come down to the Gallatin History Museum Friday September 13th for a talk, and show and tell discussion lead by local Walter Cooper Historian and Collector Kirk Stovall.

Kirk will be bringing items from his personal collection as well as sharing information about the Big Horn Gun and other artifacts in the museum collection.

This fun evening is free and open to the public with refreshments provided. Please share this and bring friends and family.

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GHM Monthly Speaker Series-Rediscovering Wonderland: How the Great Depression Shaped Yellowstone National Park-Bruce Gourley
Sep
4
6:00 PM18:00

GHM Monthly Speaker Series-Rediscovering Wonderland: How the Great Depression Shaped Yellowstone National Park-Bruce Gourley

September 4th 6pm GHM Monthly Speaker Series presents, Dr. Bruce T. Gourley (PhD, Auburn University) is the founder and editor of Yellowstone History Journal, the first journal devoted exclusively to the history of Yellowstone National Park, and the author of eight history books.

Bruce is also the creator and owner of the Yellowstone.Net website, a part-time instructor at Montana State University, and an award-winning photographer juried by Tom Murphy.

Bruce’s books include volumes on the American Civil War, Religion in America, and local history. One of his books, Images of America: Manhattan, Belgrade, Amsterdam and Churchill, was published in conjunction with the Gallatin Historical Society.

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Celebrating Gallatin County-Free Admission for County Residents and Special Book-Signing Event
Aug
10
11:00 AM11:00

Celebrating Gallatin County-Free Admission for County Residents and Special Book-Signing Event

Gallatin County Residents…the Gallatin History Museum celebrates the people, places, and stories of Gallatin County everyday and we want to give back! To show our appreciation please come down to the museum located at 317 West Main next to the Courthouse on the 2nd Saturday of each month for “Celebrating Gallatin County-Free Admission for Gallatin County Residents”.

Special Author Book-signing event with Kelly S. Hartman author of “A Brief History of Cooke City” and also Brenda Wahler author of “Montana Horse Racing-A History”.

The museum will also have a large selection of used books priced from $1.00 to $10.00 and we are clearing out a large selection of reproduction photographs mounted on poster board from past exhibits.

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Celebrating Gallatin County-Free Admission Saturday for Gallatin County Residents
Jul
13
to Jul 14

Celebrating Gallatin County-Free Admission Saturday for Gallatin County Residents

Gallatin County Residents…the Gallatin History Museum celebrates the people, places and stories of Gallatin County everyday and we want to give back! To show our appreciation please come down to the museum located at 317 West Main next to the Courthouse on the 2nd Saturday of each month for “Celebrating Gallatin County-Free Admission for Gallatin County Residents”.

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Gallatin History Museum Monthly Speaker Series-Ken Robison-World War I Montana: The Treasure State Prepares
May
1
6:00 PM18:00

Gallatin History Museum Monthly Speaker Series-Ken Robison-World War I Montana: The Treasure State Prepares

One hundred years ago, on April 6, 1917, the United States went into a war, a conflict that would have a profound effect at home and abroad. For Montana, this was a war of opportunity for many, trouble for some, and change for all. On that fateful day, the United States at last entered a European war, a war that had been raging since 1914. The oceans around us were shrinking, and the world, the U.S., and Montana would never be the same.

   It is hard today to comprehend how vitally important, Montana, The Treasure State’s forestry, mining, smelting, and, refining were to the national war effort. It has been said, with a lot of truth to it, that every bullet fired in World War I was encased in Butte copper, and the world was "wired" by copper from Great Falls refineries. In addition, Montana’s amber waves of grain helped feed a starving world. And, Montana’s cowboys, miners, foresters, farmers, nurses and other women, went to war to win, under the battle cry, “Powder River, Let ‘Er Buck” that would resonate on the battlefields in France. Montana men served in the Great War in a greater percentage than any other state.

Ken Robison will be sharing local stories researched during his writing of his latest book, World War I Montana: The Treasure State Prepares, which covers the dramatic first year of the war, as the U.S. and Montana mobilized and prepared for a decisive role in the Great War.

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GHS/GHM Annual Spring Meeting and Program
Apr
27
1:00 PM13:00

GHS/GHM Annual Spring Meeting and Program

Please join the Gallatin Historical Society/Gallatin History Museum Saturday April 27th at 1:00pm in the 3rd Floor Community Room at the Gallatin County Courthouse for our Annual Spring Meeting and Program with a reception to follow at the museum.

Executive Director Cindy Shearer will be giving a brief state of the society presentation followed by a fun and entertaining program by Humanities Montana performer/historian Neal Lewing entitled, “Gary Cooper : First, Last, and Always.”

Personifying the ideal American male, Gary Cooper, above all, was most concerned with integrity; his roles reflected those personal views. This nostalgic reintroduction to one of Hollywood's most endearing and enduring actors recreates memorable moments, from his first silent films to his dramatic last days, through the written words he spoke. Underscored by music and socio-economic history of his day, this program not only illuminates Montana’s favorite actor but also 20th century America.

 Neal Lewing is an actor, singer/songwriter, recording artist, playwright, poet, storyteller, author and historian. Managing Director of the Port Polson Players theatre, Neal served as Musical Advisor to the Custer Reenactment in Hardin, and a term on the Montana Arts Council; he also performs with the popular Montana ShamRockers. His mother’s infatuation with Gary Cooper greatly influenced his career, including the acclaimed full-length musical, Three Voices – A Musical Celebration of the Lives and Times of Gary Cooper, Jeannette Rankin and Nat King Cole, which has toured the region extensively.

This program is free and open to the public and made possible by a grant from Humanities Montana.

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Gallatin History Museum Monthly Speaker Series-Dr. Jeffrey Strickler-Whispers of the Past and Reflections on Nature: Names in Bozeman's Backyard, The Madison, Gallatin, and Bridger Ranges
Apr
3
6:00 PM18:00

Gallatin History Museum Monthly Speaker Series-Dr. Jeffrey Strickler-Whispers of the Past and Reflections on Nature: Names in Bozeman's Backyard, The Madison, Gallatin, and Bridger Ranges

Please join the Gallatin History Museum in the Hager Auditorium at MOR for a presentation by Dr. Jeffrey Stickler, Whispers of the Past and Reflections on Nature: Names in Bozeman’s
Backyard, The Madison, Gallatin and Bridger Ranges.

Dr. Jeff has been putting the finishing touches on a new book of the same title as this presentation. He has graciously offered the proceeds of this new book benefit the GHM as much of his research has been in our research library, and he is just that kind of nice guy!

Jeff is the author of “Big Sky Names: An Amble Through Western History and Ecology on the Roads, Streams, and Developments of Big Sky Montana”, “Big Sky” (Images of America Series) and “The Skier's Guide to the Biggest Skiing in America, featuring Big Sky Resort and Lone Mountain Ranch”.

Dr. Jeff Strickler started skiing at age five and the passion has continued. He raced in high school and college on the 250" hills of his home state of Minnesota, but learned big mountain skiing on family vacations in Aspen and Sun Valley. A year as an exchange student to Austria in 1960 was followed by a three month sojourn in 1969 just skiing the Alps. After a residency in pediatrics at Stanford University, and a bit of military duty in Alaska, he established a practice in Helena, MT in 1975 and has skied Big Sky ever since. Dr. Jeff and his wife, Karen, have owned several condos in the area, but bought their Meadow Village home in 1993. They moved to Big Sky full time upon his retirement in 2005. Tall, dressed in black, and seldom slow, he can be seen on the slopes or cross country trails most every day of the season.

This program is open and free to the public.

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Gallatin History Museum Monthly Speaker Series-Knapsacks and Roses, Montana's Women Veterans of World War I
Mar
6
6:00 PM18:00

Gallatin History Museum Monthly Speaker Series-Knapsacks and Roses, Montana's Women Veterans of World War I

Join the Gallatin History Museum on Wednesday, March 6th in the Hager Auditorium at MOR for author Edward E. “Ed” Saunders presentation, Knapsacks and Roses, Montana’s Women Veterans of World War I.

On the centennial year of America’s victory in World War I, his book and program tells the epic true stories of intrepid and heroic Montana women who served in uniform in that terrible upheaval: mostly as nurses in the Army Nurse Corps. 

During World War I over 200 of these courageous and indomitable women from the big sky country served stateside in crowded, understaffed, diseased-filled base hospitals, and overseas in war-torn France, enduring terrible and deadly battlefield conditions. They served an indifferent federal government denying them equality as the men.  After the war, the women came home alone, unheralded, and mostly forgotten. They faced another battle—a battle for recognition. Knapsacks and Roses showcases these women veterans using their words and through official reports of the day, shining the light of honor on these women—and all America’s women veterans of World War I—richly deserved and long overdue.

Saunders, is a retired lieutenant colonel, U.S. Army, and ground combat veteran of the Persian Gulf War. Reared in the American West, Saunders directed the effort to create the Yellowstone County [Montana] World War I Women’s Memorial.  He previously wrote and published, Sentinels, Yellowstone National Cemetery, From Prairie to Hallowed Ground, a Photographic History.  He and his wife live in Laurel, Montana. Saunders will be signing his book after the program.

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Cooks and Cookbooks of Gallatin County
Feb
6
6:00 PM18:00

Cooks and Cookbooks of Gallatin County

Join the Gallatin History Museum Monthly Speaker Series for this special presentation, "Cooks and Cookbooks of Gallatin County," with MSU Professor Mary Murphy and local community historian Richard Brown as they share the stories and research of two recently discovered cookbooks from early Bozeman.

One of the cookbooks belonged to Emma D. Weeks Willson of Bozeman, Montana. Duncan Kippen, Emma Willson's great-grandson, generously shared this volume for digitization. Emma collected these recipes from friends and family and recorded them in this book, likely beginning in 1916. Emma Weeks Willson was born March 13, 1841 in Vermont. She married Civil War Veteran and Brevet Brigadier General Lester S. Willson on March 2, 1869, and the couple arrived in Bozeman that summer. The Willsons owned and operated the Willson Company department store, spending the rest of their lives in Bozeman. Emma, in addition to being one of Gallatin County's early female residents, was well known for her musical abilities. She was an accomplished pianist and vocalist, and was very involved in Bozeman's civic, social, and religious life. She passed away in 1923 and is buried in Bozeman's Sunset Hills Cemetery.

We will also be announcing a new collaborative project entitled,
"A Hundred Years of Cooking in Gallatin County, 1864-1964: A Community History Project"

The lecture is free and open to the public.

See Less

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Local Author Book-signing and Sale Event
Dec
15
11:00 AM11:00

Local Author Book-signing and Sale Event

Shop local and support your favorite Local History Museum…the Gallatin History Museum is a non-profit that relies on the support of our members, donors, and sales from the GHM bookstore.

Stop by the museum on Saturday December 15th from 11-4 to finish up your holiday shopping needs, local authors will be on hand signing their books and looking forward to sharing a coffee and chatting about their projects. Surrounded by the artifacts, stories, and photographs of our rich and varied heritage the authors will be at individual tables throughout the museum.

This is a free and open event!

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Books and Brunch Sunday-A Gallatin History Museum Fundraiser-SOLD OUT!
Nov
18
11:00 AM11:00

Books and Brunch Sunday-A Gallatin History Museum Fundraiser-SOLD OUT!

Books and Brunch Sunday

Gallatin History Museum Fundraiser

November 18th at 11:00 am

Enjoy a catered brunch in a historic Bozeman home followed by a book reading from Phyllis Smith's book "Bozeman and the Gallatin Valley-A History."

The cost for this special event is $75.00 a person and reservations can be made for one to fourteen people.

A Gallatin Historical Society Representative will be joining you as well as a number of the home owners that were so gracious in sharing their dining rooms with us. 

You will be notified of your brunch location Nov. 14th.

Tickets can also be purchased by calling the museum at 406-522-8122 or from a board member.

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Armistice Day Program-Speakers and Exhibits-Bozeman Public Library
Nov
11
1:00 PM13:00

Armistice Day Program-Speakers and Exhibits-Bozeman Public Library

Armistice Day honored those who gave their lives in “the war to end all wars”— a day of hope that they had not given their lives in vain. But within a few years, and in spite of an impressive effort on the part of the Western democracies to limit arms and to outlaw war, aggressors rearmed and war came again. Ironically, Armistice Day was made a legal holiday in the United States in 1938, just 1 year before a second and more terrible conflagration swept across Europe.

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Animal Heroes of WWI
Nov
10
11:00 AM11:00

Animal Heroes of WWI

The Gallatin History Museum is hosting a free family day, Animal Heroes of WWI, Saturday November 10th as part of the fall collaboration project, “Legacies and Memories of World War I : Commemorating the Armistice”. Fun interactive tables will be set up in museum to learn about the role animals played during the war. Live animals will be on the property with scheduled pigeon releases throughout the day as well as fun craft make-and-takes.

BREAKING NEWS* Bozeman’s own Therapy Donkey Oliver will be in the museum from 11:00-12:30.

Over 16 million animals served in the First World War. They were used for transport, communication and companionship.

In 1914, both sides had large cavalry forces. Horse and camel-mounted troops were used in the desert campaigns throughout the war, but on the Western Front, new weapons like the machine gun made cavalry charges increasingly difficult.

However, animals remained a crucial part of the war effort. Horses, donkeys, mules and camels carried food, water, ammunition and medical supplies to men at the front, and dogs and pigeons carried messages. Canaries were used to detect poisonous gas, and cats and dogs were trained to hunt rats in the trenches.

Animals were not only used for work. Dogs, cats, and more unusual animals including monkeys, bears and lions, were kept as pets and mascots to raise morale and provide comfort amidst the hardships of war.

This special event is being held in conjunction with the Gallatin History Museum and MSU Center for Western Lands & Peoples fall 2018 collaboration, “Memories and Legacies of World War I - Commemorating the Armistice". Additional community support provided by MSU Library, the Bozeman Public Library, MSU Department of History and Philosophy, Bozeman High School, and the Museum of the Rockies.

This event is free and open to the public.

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Gallatin History Museum Monthly Speaker Series-Dale Martin-False Armistice:Wars End and Disputed Aftermaths
Nov
7
6:00 PM18:00

Gallatin History Museum Monthly Speaker Series-Dale Martin-False Armistice:Wars End and Disputed Aftermaths

The last major combat in the First World War, on the Western Front, ended on the 11th of November, 1918.  Regional conflicts and civil wars that began in the context of the Great War continued, however, into the mid-1920s in parts of Europe and Asia.  The presentation will begin with a quick overview of the war from 1914 to 1918, and then cover some aspects pertaining to Montana, such as Montana's oft-repeated claim that it contributed more soldiers, proportional to population, than any other state in the nation.  The tumultuous years after 1918 will be summarized: the political turmoil in the United States and ongoing warfare in Ireland, Russia, and Turkey.  The conclusion will consider the enduring and complex legacy of the Armistice and the symbol of the red poppy. 

 

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The Poetry of War
Oct
24
7:00 PM19:00

The Poetry of War

Enjoy a night of curated poetry in the main-hall of the Gallatin History Museum.

The Poetry of War, an evening of poetry and music inspired by the experience of World War I will take place at the Gallatin History Museum on October 24 at 7 pm. An exhibition on Gallatin County and WWI is on view and refreshments will be served.

World War I inspired an outpouring of verse and music from all around the world. While British poets like Rupert Brooke, Wilfred Owen and Siegfried Sassoon became part of a well-known canon of wartime poetry, this evening will feature voices from a wider spectrum of experiences: soldiers from both sides of the war, women who served at home and abroad, minorities asked to make the world safe for a democracy they did not share.

Before the array of electronic media available today, people gathered in their homes to listen to popular music on the phonograph and read poetry to each other, enjoy a libation and a bite to eat. Join us for such an evening and listen to the wrenching, sentimental and sometimes humorous voices animated by the Great War.

This special event is being held in conjunction with the Gallatin History Museum and MSU Center for Western Lands & People fall 2018 collaboration, “Memories and Legacies of World War I - Commemorating the Armistice".  Additional community support provided by MSU Library, the Bozeman Public Library, MSU Department of History and Philosophy, Bozeman Public School, and the Museum of the Rockies.

 

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Documentary film screening of "Hello Girls"
Oct
17
7:00 PM19:00

Documentary film screening of "Hello Girls"

Gen. John Pershing, commander of the American Expeditionary Forces in France during World War I, reviews American female telephone operators who provided a critical job during the war connecting phone calls and translating conversations between American and French troops. When the women who served in the Army Signal Corps returned home after the war and tried to join veterans organizations they were told they were civilian contractors and were not veterans. Efforts to get them veteran recognition took more than six decades. (Photo: National Archives)

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International Archaeology Day-Free Museum Day
Oct
13
11:00 AM11:00

International Archaeology Day-Free Museum Day

Join the Gallatin History Museum and Project Archaeology as we partner to celebrate International Archaeology Day with fun interactive children’s tables. Stations will be set up in the main-hall of the museum using museum artifacts and photographs from the collection to engage and inspire young explorers.

International Archaeology Day is a celebration of archaeology and the thrill of discovery. Every October the AIA and archaeological organizations across the United States, Canada, and abroad present archaeological programs and activities for people of all ages and interests. Whether it is a family-friendly archaeology fair, a guided tour of a local archaeological site, a simulated dig, a lecture or a classroom visit from an archaeologist, the interactive, hands-on International Archaeology Day programs provide the chance to indulge your inner Indiana Jones.

This event is free and open to the public.

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Gallatin History Museum Monthly Speaker Series-Todd Harwell-"No More War, No More Plague-The Spanish Influenze Pandemic Toll on Montana"
Oct
10
6:00 PM18:00

Gallatin History Museum Monthly Speaker Series-Todd Harwell-"No More War, No More Plague-The Spanish Influenze Pandemic Toll on Montana"

The 1918 influenza pandemic is recognized as the most devastating infectious disease event in recorded history, causing more than 50 million deaths worldwide. This year marks the 100th anniversary of the flu pandemic and public health remains critical in preparing for and mitigating serious infectious disease threats.

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Memories and Legacies of World War I : Commemorating The Armistice
Oct
9
to Nov 11

Memories and Legacies of World War I : Commemorating The Armistice

This first time collaborative event to celebrate the 100th Anniversary of the end of WWI and commemorate Armistice Day November 11th will include book club, lectures, a night of poetry, children’s day at GHM, music and dance performance, and to close on November 11th the Bozeman Public Library will host guest speakers, experts on WWI artifacts and photographs.

Location, dates and times will be posted individually. All events are open and free to the public!

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Memories and Legacies of World War I-Book Club
Oct
9
6:30 PM18:30

Memories and Legacies of World War I-Book Club

Much of what we know and feel about the First World War we owe to Vera Brittain’s elegiac yet unsparing book, which set a standard for memoirists from Martha Gellhorn to Lillian Hellman. Abandoning her studies at Oxford in 1915 to enlist as a nurse in the armed services, Brittain served in London, in Malta, and on the Western Front. By war’s end she had lost virtually everyone she loved. Testament of Youth is both a record of what she lived through and an elegy for a vanished generation. Hailed by the Times Literary Suplement as a book that helped "both form and define the mood of its time," it speaks to any generation that has been irrevocably changed by war.

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Conservation Bus Tour with Gallatin Valley Land Trust
May
24
5:30 PM17:30

Conservation Bus Tour with Gallatin Valley Land Trust

 

Much of our valley's open spaces are in agricultural production. We're taking two bus loads of our friends to meet the people behind the scenes and learn about the rich heritage that was protected along with the land. Special guests and partners from the Gallatin History Museum will be sharing fun facts about the agricultural history of the Gallatin Valley and how it has shaped the place we know and love.

Registration for the Conservation Bus Tour is open. This event is free and open to the public. The tour always sells out so if you cannot use your ticket, please cancel so we can fill your seat.

This year's Conservation Bus Tour* will highlight the rich heritage and history of our agricultural lands and farming families. We're very excited to be hosting this tour in partnership with our friends at the Gallatin History Museum. We'll board the buses at the Gallatin History Museum and head toward the Springhill area where we'll visit two conserved properties. Both properties utilized funding from the Gallatin County Open Lands Program to conserve the open land in perpetuity. Gallatin County voters will have an opportunity to renew funding for this program through an Open Lands Levy on the June 5th ballot. The levy will allow GVLT and others to continue protecting historically significant farms like the ones we'll visit, along with habitat, water, and working lands across our valley.

The tour will stop at the Toohey property to hear about the family history on the land and the homestead history, including tours of historic buildings, filled with original tools, that were used when the farm was first established. We'll then visit the 13 Mile Lamb and Wool property and hear about the Reese Family homestead and history of the land.

In between visits the Gallatin History Museum will share fun and interesting facts about the history of farming in the Gallatin Valley. Much of Bozeman's history, and the history of other towns throughout the valley, are rooted in agriculture. You'll have great tidbits to share at your next dinner party! When did farming start here and why? Who were the people that homesteaded here and where did they come from? What types of crops were growing in different parts of the valley and why? How did different national events affect the agricultural community in the Gallatin Valley? Why was this valley so unique for agricultural?

The tour will end at the Gallatin History Museum and we'll have a brief optional reception in the museum to see the new agricultural heritage exhibit.

GVLT is the beneficiary of Bozeman Craft Beer Week and we'll be drinking the collaboration beer specially brewed for GVLT, Gallatin Valley Lager. Snacks provided but attendees should plan to eat dinner before or after the tour.

* Please note that this is a school bus, not a fancy bus. We're a nonprofit after all!

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/conservation-bus-tour-tickets-45324836807

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If These Walls Could Talk-Researching a Historic Building with the Extreme History Project
May
19
9:00 AM09:00

If These Walls Could Talk-Researching a Historic Building with the Extreme History Project

Every building has a history and a story to tell. In this workshop, you’ll learn how to uncover the history of a house or a historic building. Experts will share their research techniques and we'll introduce you to maps, historic photographs, city directories, and many other tools at the Gallatin History Museum that will help you in your research to uncover the history of a house or building. You’ll have the opportunity to receive hands-on direction in exploring the Gallatin History Museum archives. We will take a short walking tour of a historic neighborhood to better understand the architectural styles and character of historic Bozeman.

When: May 19, 2018 9am to 5pm
Where: Gallatin County Court House and Gallatin History Museum, Bozeman, MT
Registration: $45 for non-members, $41 for members or register for all three workshops for $120. Registration fee includes all materials, lunch and snacks. Follow this link to purchase tickets online. https://www.eventbrite.com/e/if-these-walls-could-talk-researching-a-historic-house-or-building-tickets-45071701673
More Information or to register: Contact Crystal Alegria at crystal@extremehistoryproject.org

A big THANK YOU to our sponsors and partners on the Making History Relevant Workshop Series:
Humanities Montana
Gallatin History Museum
Montana State University Library
Montana State University Special Collections and Archives
MSU's Center for Western Lands and Peoples
Museum of the Rockies
Gallatin County Genealogical Society
Generous support from a local anonymous donor

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Gallatin History Museum Monthly Speaker Series-Wolfgram-Hale-East Gallatin/Hamilton Cemetary:  Locating the Unmarked Component
May
9
6:00 PM18:00

Gallatin History Museum Monthly Speaker Series-Wolfgram-Hale-East Gallatin/Hamilton Cemetary: Locating the Unmarked Component

Please join the Gallatin History Museum Monthly Speaker Series Wednesday May 7th at 6:00 in the Hager Auditorium at MOR.

East Gallatin/Hamilton Cemetery:  Locating the Unmarked Component

Presenters Terri Wolfgram and Eileen Skinner-Hale

The East Gallatin (also known as The Hamilton) Cemetery was one of the earliest formal burial grounds in the Gallatin Valley, established in 1865 by the pioneer families settling the rich farm lands. These people were the first ones that entered the valley in covered wagons in 1864 headed for the gold fields of Alder Gulch while the Civil War was still raging in and ravaging the lands to the east. Many left the deplorable lawless conditions of Nevada and Virginia City and returned to farm the Gallatin Valley.
The cemetery has 260 marked graves and many unmarked burials including a “Pauper Section”. Some family have four generations buried there starting in the 1860s until present. After the droughts hitting the farmers hard from 1919 on and then the desperation of the Great Depression of the 1930s, many of the families moved away and the cemetery was untended, becoming overgrown with sage, thistles and other weeds – the existing tombstones barely visible.
In 2016, a group of locals decided to clean up and revive the historic cemetery. The revived the Cemetery Board, solicited funds to record graves and identify un-marked burials, of which there are over 200. With help from the Montana Archaeological Society’s Conservation Fund, along with help from the Historic Preservation Board of Gallatin County, and other funding and labor sources, the work of research, magnetometry, Ground Penetrating Radar and individual documentation of each marked grave began with the final goal of providing an accurate map of the burial locations. This talk will take you through the process.

Terri Wolfgram, a resident of the Gallatin Valley for 46 years,  received her degree in Anthropology from MSU.  She retired from a pay check in 2013 after working with Dr. Les Davis and the Museum of the Rockies for 10 years and then the Bureau of Land Management for 16 years, where she developed an expertise in historic mining.  Forever an archaeologist, she spends her “retirement” time digging in the dirt of her garden or on archaeological/historical projects of personal interest.

Elaine Skinner Hale, born in the Gallatin Valley, graduated from MSU and received a MS in Anthropology from the Univ. of MT.  Retired after 25 years working in archaeology and historic preservation in Yellowstone National Park, she has returned to her Manhattan home where she enjoys working on various cultural projects.

 

This event is free of charge and open to the public. Thank you to Museum of the Rockies for co-hosting this evening.

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Ice Patch Program and Exhibit Opening
May
2
9:30 AM09:30

Ice Patch Program and Exhibit Opening

Ice Patch Exhibit Opening and Presentation
May 2nd 6:30 Gallatin History Museum Main Hall
Dr. Craig M. Lee
Free and Open to the Public

Just as the technological development of the aqualung and submersibles opened the oceans to archaeology and other research opportunities, global warming is opening the cryosphere as a new research frontier. The identification of rare, unique and important artifacts and paleobiological specimens at melting ice patches holds the potential to revolutionize anthropological theories and concepts pertaining to human adaptation and utilization of the Alpine. This evening’s talk will convey some of the exciting results stemming from ice patch research in the Greater Yellowstone and beyond.

Dr. Craig M. Lee is a is a Research Scientist II/Associate Professor at the Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research (INSTAAR), an Adjunct Instructor in the Department of Sociology & Anthropology at Montana State University, and a Principal Investigator at Metcalf Archaeological Consultants. He earned his Ph.D. from the University of Colorado at Boulder, an M.A. from the University of Wyoming, and a B.S. from Montana State University. He serves on the boards of directors for the PaleoCultural Research Group and the Lamb Spring Archaeological Preserve and volunteers with numerous organizations. His research interests include the human ecology and landscape archaeology of alpine and high latitude environments with an emphasis on sharing the process and results with numerous audiences, including the professional scientific community, descendant Native American communities, and the public. Dr. Lee’s research has been published in numerous venues, including Antiquity, American Antiquity, Arctic, and The Holocene.

The exhibit will be up until July 31, 2018.

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Gallatin Historical Society Spring Members Meeting and Program
Apr
21
1:00 PM13:00

Gallatin Historical Society Spring Members Meeting and Program

The name Calamity Jane brings to mind an iconic character of the American West.  Accounts of Calamity—whose real name was Martha Canary—are legion and she has achieved mythical status in the lore of the frontier.  She lived and traveled throughout Wyoming, Montana, and the Dakotas from 1867 to 1903, during some of the West’s wildest days. The voracious Victorian press sensationalized her activities, and as a flamboyant character in popular dime novels, Calamity Jane’s legend grew until the person behind the character all but disappeared.  Mary Jane Bradbury will bring to life insights about Calamity’s real life through the eyes of madam Dora DuFran, a Black Hills pioneer, entrepreneur and close friend of Calamity’s. Ms. DuFran built a successful red light business during the rambunctious early days of the western frontier in Deadwood, South Dakota, and has a unique perspective about how wild it really was.  Ms. DuFran knows better than anyone the life of Martha Canary and Calamity Jane, two quite different women, one legendary, one all but forgotten. 

 

Mary Jane Bradbury is a scholar and actress with over 25 years of experience bringing history to life for audiences of all ages in the Rocky Mountain region.  She is a member of the Humanities Montana and Colorado Humanities Speakers Bureaus, and before moving to Montana, was an historic interpreter for the Denver Museum of Nature and Science.

 

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Gallatin History Museum Monthly Speaker Series-Chere' Jiusto and Christine Brown-MPA
Apr
11
6:00 PM18:00

Gallatin History Museum Monthly Speaker Series-Chere' Jiusto and Christine Brown-MPA

Explore the hayloft, stalls, and hardware of a Montana barn and you will learn much about the state's farm and ranch traditions. Crib barns, with walls of timber stacked like Lincoln logs, show the influence of French-Canadian and Scandinavian immigrants. Gambrel-roofed barns, which shed heavy snowfall and provide roomy haylofts, tell of the long Montana winters that necessitated ample hay storage. Tack rooms, once filled with harnesses and gear, tell of workhorses given shelter in heavy-duty stalls nearby.

Beyond their utilitarian functions, barns are simply beautiful. Some stand proudly, their freshly painted red lines contrasting sharply with the golden wheat in surrounding fields. But some, less fortunate, are falling into disrepair. Marked by rotting timbers and broken windowpanes, these crumbling buildings still have much to teach us. Historic Barns of Montana presents the best, most unique, most significant, and most beautiful of these barns. Photographer Tom Ferris explored barns inside and out across Montana, snapping the hundreds of photographs in the book. Authors and architectural historians Chere Jiusto and Christine Brown help readers understand the significance of what they are looking at and tell the stories of individual barns.

Historic Barns of Montana recognizes these buildings as both useful and beautiful, encourages their preservation, and honors the ranch and farm families that built them.

Book available for purchase in the Gallatin History Museum bookstore.

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Gallatin History Museum Monthly Speaker Series-Tory Taylor
Mar
7
6:00 PM18:00

Gallatin History Museum Monthly Speaker Series-Tory Taylor

On the Trail of the Mountain Shoshone Sheep Eaters: A High Altitude Archaeological and Anthropological Odyssey    

Tory Taylor is an avid outdoorsman who has spent his entire adult life exploring and experiencing the natural and human history of the Greater Yellowstone ecosystem. His interest in Sheep Eater archaeology led him on a personal odyssey. As a wilderness horse outfitter, he generously shared his knowledge with those he guided through this last intact temperate zone ecosystem. Taylor now enjoys hunting, wilderness trips with his wife Meredith and solo trips through the mountains with his loyal horses.    

 Tory Taylor's book "On the Trail..." is about the Mountain Shoshone, the people who lived in Wyoming’s Wind River and Absaroka ranges prior to European contact. It makes use of ethnographic data, observations by early 19th century explorers and mountain men, archaeological data and Taylor’s own experience in locating archaeological sites and experimenting with the technology and diet of these Native Americans. As someone who knows the archaeology well, I found no errors in the book, and even learned a few things from it. But it is also more: it is a kind, calm, and caring book, written by a kind, calm and caring hand. The reader learns about the Shoshone, but also about respect for land, for knowledge, and for other people. The language is utterly accessible to all, and the text is knowledgeable. It is neither encyclopedic nor analytical and it does not intend to be. Instead it is an understanding of the region’s history by someone who knows the Greater Yellowstone area personally, as a hunting guide and outfitter and who has assisted in its archaeological investigation. Knowing the Mountain Shoshone through Taylor’s eyes produces a better book for the lay reader than a trained archaeological expert such as myself could write. I enjoyed it and I think many others will as well. The audience includes anyone interested in the natural history, archaeology and human history of the Greater Yellowstone ecosystem. R.L. Kelly         

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2018 Family Fundraiser Costume Gala
Feb
17
5:30 PM17:30

2018 Family Fundraiser Costume Gala

Join us on February 17th at 5:30 pm for a family-friendly evening on the frontier to celebrate the museum’s new programs and exhibits!

The event will include catered food and drink, historical characters, costumes, and family activities. Families can enjoy museum exhibits, treasure hunts, games and prizes, as well as a silent auction and raffle. All proceeds from the event will benefit Gallatin History Museum’s Education Programs.

Tickets are $50 for a family, or $25 for an individual adult.

Purchase tickets

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Gallatin History Museum Monthly Speaker Series-Mark Browning
Jan
10
6:00 PM18:00

Gallatin History Museum Monthly Speaker Series-Mark Browning

The First Photographers: Eastern Montana Territory From 1870s

A photographic record of the military, civilian and native inhabitants following the Battle of the Little Bighorn in Montana Territory.

Following the American Civil War, the U.S. Army’s domestic attention turned to the protection of European based settlers moving west. After the humiliating defeat at the Battle of the Little Bighorn, the resultant build and related activities of Fort Keogh was documented by photographers commissioned to record the changes to this new frontier. Names such as Fouch, Morrow, Huffman and Barthelmess were hired to accomplish this and were followed by the civilian efforts such as those by R.C.Morrison, E.J. Cameron and others. See examples of their “first-ever” captures along with brief histories of these early pioneers.

Mark Browning is  third generation Montanan from Miles City, he began actively gathering historic images of these early photographers in 1995 when he returned as executive director/ curator of its WaterWorks Art Museum (formerly Custer County Art & Heritage Center). Over the next 20 years, he oversaw the Museum's collected vintage works and information related to these figures.

Thank you to Museum of the Rockies for providing the use of the Hager Auditorium and to their staff that makes it possible.  This event is free and open to the public.  

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Honoring Our Veterans: A Young History Explorers Program
Nov
11
11:00 AM11:00

Honoring Our Veterans: A Young History Explorers Program

Join us for a special Veteran's Day event for children! Families will have the opportunity to explore exhibits, photographs and firsthand accounts of Montana's involvement in the United States Armed Forces, including our special World War I exhibit. Visitors can learn about the origins of Montana State University's ROTC program, and will be able to view artifacts that belonged to local members of the military throughout history. Children can create crafts and artwork honoring a veteran in their life or community!

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